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From Plain-Jane to Sexy

From Plain-Jane to Sexy


How to dress up ice cream for a easy dinner party dessert

Making chocolate abstracts

Sure, I scream, you scream. But when it comes to ice cream, do you ever find your inner aesthete wishing for a way to just dress it up a bit? Me too. So I’ve come up with a super simple serving suggestion that will make your dinner party guests “Ooh” and “Ahh.” My chocolate abstracts.

Making these edible decorations is crazy easy: You’re just melting chocolate in the microwave, letting it cool a bit, and then squeezing it into fun shapes on parchment paper. A couple hours in the freezer and you’ve got an artsy accessory to transform even the simplest of desserts into a stone-cold, sexy treat. Feel free to use your favorite ice cream flavor, and for extra-frosty fabulousness, freeze martini or rocks glasses for serving. At the table, add a splash of Amaretto or a drizzle of myHomemade Cherry Syrup for another layer of festive flavor. (Photo courtesy of William Geddes)

Click here to see the Ice Cream with Amaretto and Chocolate Abstracts recipe.


There are two basic ways to make your soap whiter:

  • Add some Titanium Dioxide (TD). If you're using Water-based Titanium Dioxide, you add it to your lye-water mixture. If you're using Oil-based Titanium Dioxide, then you can add it to your melted oils at any time up to trace. With either version of TD, we usually add about 1 tsp. per pound of oils. (ie. If your recipe has 32 oz. of oils in it, use 2 tsp. of TD). Once you get the feel for how TD works in your soap, you can use it to lighten the entire batch, or just part of a batch—incorporating it into swirls with other colors.
  • Adjust your recipe with "whiter" oils. Harder oils, like beef tallow, lard, coconut or palm kernel oil, will usually yield you whiter soap. A little bit of Castor in the recipe will also help give you a nice hard white bar, as will really light-colored olive oil (Note: usually only the "refined grade A" or extra virgin is light enough color to not impart any of the green to the soap).

So, here are a few simple recipes using these oils that should give you a nice hard white bar of soap with or without the Titanium Dioxide. (You can order beef tallow commercially from soapmaking oil suppliers like Columbus Foods, or it's really easy to render tallow for soap making yourself.)


There are two basic ways to make your soap whiter:

  • Add some Titanium Dioxide (TD). If you're using Water-based Titanium Dioxide, you add it to your lye-water mixture. If you're using Oil-based Titanium Dioxide, then you can add it to your melted oils at any time up to trace. With either version of TD, we usually add about 1 tsp. per pound of oils. (ie. If your recipe has 32 oz. of oils in it, use 2 tsp. of TD). Once you get the feel for how TD works in your soap, you can use it to lighten the entire batch, or just part of a batch—incorporating it into swirls with other colors.
  • Adjust your recipe with "whiter" oils. Harder oils, like beef tallow, lard, coconut or palm kernel oil, will usually yield you whiter soap. A little bit of Castor in the recipe will also help give you a nice hard white bar, as will really light-colored olive oil (Note: usually only the "refined grade A" or extra virgin is light enough color to not impart any of the green to the soap).

So, here are a few simple recipes using these oils that should give you a nice hard white bar of soap with or without the Titanium Dioxide. (You can order beef tallow commercially from soapmaking oil suppliers like Columbus Foods, or it's really easy to render tallow for soap making yourself.)


There are two basic ways to make your soap whiter:

  • Add some Titanium Dioxide (TD). If you're using Water-based Titanium Dioxide, you add it to your lye-water mixture. If you're using Oil-based Titanium Dioxide, then you can add it to your melted oils at any time up to trace. With either version of TD, we usually add about 1 tsp. per pound of oils. (ie. If your recipe has 32 oz. of oils in it, use 2 tsp. of TD). Once you get the feel for how TD works in your soap, you can use it to lighten the entire batch, or just part of a batch—incorporating it into swirls with other colors.
  • Adjust your recipe with "whiter" oils. Harder oils, like beef tallow, lard, coconut or palm kernel oil, will usually yield you whiter soap. A little bit of Castor in the recipe will also help give you a nice hard white bar, as will really light-colored olive oil (Note: usually only the "refined grade A" or extra virgin is light enough color to not impart any of the green to the soap).

So, here are a few simple recipes using these oils that should give you a nice hard white bar of soap with or without the Titanium Dioxide. (You can order beef tallow commercially from soapmaking oil suppliers like Columbus Foods, or it's really easy to render tallow for soap making yourself.)


There are two basic ways to make your soap whiter:

  • Add some Titanium Dioxide (TD). If you're using Water-based Titanium Dioxide, you add it to your lye-water mixture. If you're using Oil-based Titanium Dioxide, then you can add it to your melted oils at any time up to trace. With either version of TD, we usually add about 1 tsp. per pound of oils. (ie. If your recipe has 32 oz. of oils in it, use 2 tsp. of TD). Once you get the feel for how TD works in your soap, you can use it to lighten the entire batch, or just part of a batch—incorporating it into swirls with other colors.
  • Adjust your recipe with "whiter" oils. Harder oils, like beef tallow, lard, coconut or palm kernel oil, will usually yield you whiter soap. A little bit of Castor in the recipe will also help give you a nice hard white bar, as will really light-colored olive oil (Note: usually only the "refined grade A" or extra virgin is light enough color to not impart any of the green to the soap).

So, here are a few simple recipes using these oils that should give you a nice hard white bar of soap with or without the Titanium Dioxide. (You can order beef tallow commercially from soapmaking oil suppliers like Columbus Foods, or it's really easy to render tallow for soap making yourself.)


There are two basic ways to make your soap whiter:

  • Add some Titanium Dioxide (TD). If you're using Water-based Titanium Dioxide, you add it to your lye-water mixture. If you're using Oil-based Titanium Dioxide, then you can add it to your melted oils at any time up to trace. With either version of TD, we usually add about 1 tsp. per pound of oils. (ie. If your recipe has 32 oz. of oils in it, use 2 tsp. of TD). Once you get the feel for how TD works in your soap, you can use it to lighten the entire batch, or just part of a batch—incorporating it into swirls with other colors.
  • Adjust your recipe with "whiter" oils. Harder oils, like beef tallow, lard, coconut or palm kernel oil, will usually yield you whiter soap. A little bit of Castor in the recipe will also help give you a nice hard white bar, as will really light-colored olive oil (Note: usually only the "refined grade A" or extra virgin is light enough color to not impart any of the green to the soap).

So, here are a few simple recipes using these oils that should give you a nice hard white bar of soap with or without the Titanium Dioxide. (You can order beef tallow commercially from soapmaking oil suppliers like Columbus Foods, or it's really easy to render tallow for soap making yourself.)


There are two basic ways to make your soap whiter:

  • Add some Titanium Dioxide (TD). If you're using Water-based Titanium Dioxide, you add it to your lye-water mixture. If you're using Oil-based Titanium Dioxide, then you can add it to your melted oils at any time up to trace. With either version of TD, we usually add about 1 tsp. per pound of oils. (ie. If your recipe has 32 oz. of oils in it, use 2 tsp. of TD). Once you get the feel for how TD works in your soap, you can use it to lighten the entire batch, or just part of a batch—incorporating it into swirls with other colors.
  • Adjust your recipe with "whiter" oils. Harder oils, like beef tallow, lard, coconut or palm kernel oil, will usually yield you whiter soap. A little bit of Castor in the recipe will also help give you a nice hard white bar, as will really light-colored olive oil (Note: usually only the "refined grade A" or extra virgin is light enough color to not impart any of the green to the soap).

So, here are a few simple recipes using these oils that should give you a nice hard white bar of soap with or without the Titanium Dioxide. (You can order beef tallow commercially from soapmaking oil suppliers like Columbus Foods, or it's really easy to render tallow for soap making yourself.)


There are two basic ways to make your soap whiter:

  • Add some Titanium Dioxide (TD). If you're using Water-based Titanium Dioxide, you add it to your lye-water mixture. If you're using Oil-based Titanium Dioxide, then you can add it to your melted oils at any time up to trace. With either version of TD, we usually add about 1 tsp. per pound of oils. (ie. If your recipe has 32 oz. of oils in it, use 2 tsp. of TD). Once you get the feel for how TD works in your soap, you can use it to lighten the entire batch, or just part of a batch—incorporating it into swirls with other colors.
  • Adjust your recipe with "whiter" oils. Harder oils, like beef tallow, lard, coconut or palm kernel oil, will usually yield you whiter soap. A little bit of Castor in the recipe will also help give you a nice hard white bar, as will really light-colored olive oil (Note: usually only the "refined grade A" or extra virgin is light enough color to not impart any of the green to the soap).

So, here are a few simple recipes using these oils that should give you a nice hard white bar of soap with or without the Titanium Dioxide. (You can order beef tallow commercially from soapmaking oil suppliers like Columbus Foods, or it's really easy to render tallow for soap making yourself.)


There are two basic ways to make your soap whiter:

  • Add some Titanium Dioxide (TD). If you're using Water-based Titanium Dioxide, you add it to your lye-water mixture. If you're using Oil-based Titanium Dioxide, then you can add it to your melted oils at any time up to trace. With either version of TD, we usually add about 1 tsp. per pound of oils. (ie. If your recipe has 32 oz. of oils in it, use 2 tsp. of TD). Once you get the feel for how TD works in your soap, you can use it to lighten the entire batch, or just part of a batch—incorporating it into swirls with other colors.
  • Adjust your recipe with "whiter" oils. Harder oils, like beef tallow, lard, coconut or palm kernel oil, will usually yield you whiter soap. A little bit of Castor in the recipe will also help give you a nice hard white bar, as will really light-colored olive oil (Note: usually only the "refined grade A" or extra virgin is light enough color to not impart any of the green to the soap).

So, here are a few simple recipes using these oils that should give you a nice hard white bar of soap with or without the Titanium Dioxide. (You can order beef tallow commercially from soapmaking oil suppliers like Columbus Foods, or it's really easy to render tallow for soap making yourself.)


There are two basic ways to make your soap whiter:

  • Add some Titanium Dioxide (TD). If you're using Water-based Titanium Dioxide, you add it to your lye-water mixture. If you're using Oil-based Titanium Dioxide, then you can add it to your melted oils at any time up to trace. With either version of TD, we usually add about 1 tsp. per pound of oils. (ie. If your recipe has 32 oz. of oils in it, use 2 tsp. of TD). Once you get the feel for how TD works in your soap, you can use it to lighten the entire batch, or just part of a batch—incorporating it into swirls with other colors.
  • Adjust your recipe with "whiter" oils. Harder oils, like beef tallow, lard, coconut or palm kernel oil, will usually yield you whiter soap. A little bit of Castor in the recipe will also help give you a nice hard white bar, as will really light-colored olive oil (Note: usually only the "refined grade A" or extra virgin is light enough color to not impart any of the green to the soap).

So, here are a few simple recipes using these oils that should give you a nice hard white bar of soap with or without the Titanium Dioxide. (You can order beef tallow commercially from soapmaking oil suppliers like Columbus Foods, or it's really easy to render tallow for soap making yourself.)


There are two basic ways to make your soap whiter:

  • Add some Titanium Dioxide (TD). If you're using Water-based Titanium Dioxide, you add it to your lye-water mixture. If you're using Oil-based Titanium Dioxide, then you can add it to your melted oils at any time up to trace. With either version of TD, we usually add about 1 tsp. per pound of oils. (ie. If your recipe has 32 oz. of oils in it, use 2 tsp. of TD). Once you get the feel for how TD works in your soap, you can use it to lighten the entire batch, or just part of a batch—incorporating it into swirls with other colors.
  • Adjust your recipe with "whiter" oils. Harder oils, like beef tallow, lard, coconut or palm kernel oil, will usually yield you whiter soap. A little bit of Castor in the recipe will also help give you a nice hard white bar, as will really light-colored olive oil (Note: usually only the "refined grade A" or extra virgin is light enough color to not impart any of the green to the soap).

So, here are a few simple recipes using these oils that should give you a nice hard white bar of soap with or without the Titanium Dioxide. (You can order beef tallow commercially from soapmaking oil suppliers like Columbus Foods, or it's really easy to render tallow for soap making yourself.)


Watch the video: Plain Jane. A$AP Ferg. Choreography by Claire Karapidaki. @prodancersstudio